Ashley Scott Kelly

Forum on Sustainable Infrastructure with ADB and WWF

The Asian Development Bank (ADB), together with World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and Vietnam's Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, hosted the Forum on Sustainable Infrastructure: Integrating Climate Resilience and Natural Capital into Transport Infrastructure Planning and Design on May 17 and 18 in Hanoi, Vietnam.

During the forum, Ashley Scott Kelly presented innovative ways that design-level considerations can drive sustainable infrastructure planning. His talk, "Infrastructure, Impact and Uncertainty: Scenario-based approaches to upstream design, wildlife connectivity and sustainable construction in transport planning for southern Myanmar", included work on the Dawei Road Link with Dorothy Tang at HKU, WWF, and Smithsonian.

The event convened planners, engineers and climate specialists alongside government ministries, multilateral banks, bilateral aid agencies, infrastructure finance investment firms, NGOs and academia. The forum was divided into five sessions, covering: 1) Designing ecologically sensitive transport infrastructure; 2) Building resilient infrastructure working with nature and bioengineering; 3) Facilitating finance for sustainable infrastructure; 4) Improving options with better planning; and 5) Strengthening the enabling environment.

The forum was attended by high-level officials, including a large delegation from Myanmar: Directors General of the Ministries of Construction and Rail Transportation, and Directors and Deputies from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation, Highways, Investment, and Transport and Communications. Government ministries also joined from China, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Mongolia, Thailand, Cambodia, Lao, and Vietnam. Experts attended from institutions and organizations from across Asia, Europe, Australia, and the Americas.

http://www.gms-eoc.org/events/forum-on-sustainable-infrastructure-

Forum on Sustainable Infrastructure: Integrating Climate Resilience and Natural Capital into Transport Infrastructure Planning and Design
Forum on Sustainable Infrastructure: Integrating Climate Resilience and Natural Capital into Transport Infrastructure Planning and Design
Forum on Sustainable Infrastructure: Integrating Climate Resilience and Natural Capital into Transport Infrastructure Planning and Design
Forum on Sustainable Infrastructure: Integrating Climate Resilience and Natural Capital into Transport Infrastructure Planning and Design
Forum on Sustainable Infrastructure: Integrating Climate Resilience and Natural Capital into Transport Infrastructure Planning and Design
Forum on Sustainable Infrastructure: Integrating Climate Resilience and Natural Capital into Transport Infrastructure Planning and Design

Design Manual for Dawei Road

Tang, D., and Kelly, A.S. (2016). Design Manual: Building a Sustainable Road to Dawei. Worldwide Fund for Nature (Myanmar). 76pp.

The manual combines species profiles and habitat characteristics with a catalog of sustainable road construction technologies and wildlife mitigation measures, and applies them to design scenarios at specific example sites along the Dawei road. Together, this manual and the Wildlife Crossing report a set of critical tools and approaches to planning, design, and maintenance of the Dawei road and similar large-scale infrastructure corridors. Both works target wide audiences and are written and graphically narrated to inform road builders, policy makers, and communities alike of best practices, risks, and the critical value of well-planned sustainable transport infrastructure.


Wildlife Crossing

Kelly, A.S., Connette, G., Helsingen, H., and Paing Soe. (2016). Wildlife Crossing: Locating species' movement corridors in Tanintharyi. Worldwide Fund for Nature (Myanmar). 49pp.

This report is a collaboration between landscape designers, policy strategists, and species biologists from HKU, Smithsonian, WWF, FFI, and WCS. The importance of the study is that it takes abstract regional models from conservation biology developed over the past decade and applies them to site-specific conditions for the design of wildlife crossings where data is extremely limited. A set of principles was developed to reduce the abstraction and potential error in regional models of animal movement rate (proxied by electric circuit theory) and is potentially a breakthrough in multi-species modeling using these techniques, still critiqued as impractical only a year ago. The entire process is automated and outputs an optimized set of potential wildlife crossings as segments, rather than points, to allow flexibility in decision-making during road design and alignment due to costing and local landscape conditions.


HK Development and Conservation Roundtable

Land Development and Conservation in Hong Kong - Roundtable and Workshop convened a panel of academics and NGOs to debate land supply over an interactive mapping platform that composites and visualizes key land data across scales.

The event was hosted by Mr. Ashley Scott Kelly of HKU's Faculty of Architecture and co-organized by HKU, Liber Research Community, Designing Hong Kong, Professional Commons, Land Watch, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Hong Kong, and Save Our Country Parks.


3D Terrain Models

3D-printed models of landscape design scenarios for data-poor sites, January 2016
Kelly, A.S., and Tang, D.

A fully automated process takes low-resolution site data, plus assumptions about hydrology, rough land cover delineated from aerials (not multi-spectral), and designed road elements and wildlife mitigation measures, to fabricate much higher-resolution site models than available data permits. Because of the complexity of the surface produced, production is also automated to reduce printer material waste and account for necessary tolerances when working with plant-derived plastics. These are on display in WWF's Yangon office and have been used in stakeholder meetings, including with the Dawei SEZ and road link developer in Bangkok.


Infrastructure scenarios shown at conservation technology symposium in Washington DC

Modelling Infrastructure Scenarios in Data-Poor Regions:
Land change, mitigation strategies, and 3D-printed landscapes

Ashley Scott Kelly, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Architecture, The University of Hong Kong
Dorothy Tang, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Architecture, The University of Hong Kong
Hanna Helsingen, Green Economy Team Lead, WWF Myanmar
Nirmal Bhagabati, Senior Scientist, Natural Capital, WWF US

A series of 3D-printed surface models detail design solutions for mitigating impacts of new road infrastructure on wildlife habitat and ecosystem services in southern Myanmar. More methodology than pure technology, these models facilitate dialogue on possible futures and exhibit the increasing levels of detail and narrative achievable with innovative approaches to site design in places that otherwise lack specific data and resolution.

Exhibited at World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Fuller Symposium 2015: Wired in the Wild: Can technology save the planet?, National Geographic, Washington DC.

Scenario 1: Hybrid Landscape Approach
Scenario 1: Hybrid Landscape Approach
Scenario 1: Hybrid Landscape Approach
Scenario 1: Hybrid Landscape Approach
Scenario 2: Engineered Approach
Scenario 2: Engineered Approach
Scenario 2: Engineered Approach
Scenario 2: Engineered Approach
In-situ studies of three alignment scenarios at three locations along the Dawei road
In-situ studies of three alignment scenarios at three locations along the Dawei road

Preliminary Announcement, Hong Kong Land Development Roundtable

Land Development and Conservation in Hong Kong - Roundtable and Workshop

Development debates surrounding conversion of Hong Kong's conservation areas are understandably polarized. These conversations will remain superficial and without traction unless a strategy can be developed for systematically analysing the Development Bureau's "multi-pronged" approaches. While action to improve country park continuity has waned since clear advances two years ago, zoning amendments for some 150 proposed housing locations, almost half within Green Belts, are ongoing to fulfill the Bureau's short-term development goals. Medium- and long-term strategies, including development of country parks and reclamation studies, parallel these efforts. Planners, academics, and citizens must be both supportive and critical of piecemeal and negotiated approaches to development, especially where conservation land uses are at stake. The need for territory-wide dialogue is imminent.

Sustainable development is best achieved with wide access to information, participation and public support. However, most information available to the public is either shown in aggregate across the territory or scaled to individual sites. For these reasons, the Land Development and Conservation in Hong Kong Roundtable and Workshop will showcase the act of analysis and informed spatial debate. The programme for 27 February is half roundtable, half workshop. Following presentations of case studies by academics and think tanks, an open working session is organized around an interactive map of spatially explicit, publicly available information to simultaneously deepen and broaden development and conservation debates.

All interested are welcome to attend.

Download Event Briefing (2016-02-05)

Updates will be posted to www.designforconservation.org

Diagram of Hong Kong Green Belt government-proposed housing sites